Concurrent Sessions 2018

2018 Concurrent Sessions

 Concurrent Sessions #1 (Thursday, 1:30 pm-2:30 pm)

CC1A: Culture Change and Person-Centered Care:  The Road to Civility

Cheryl Kruschke, Associate Professor, Regis University

Incivility has been a serious issue in healthcare for many years.  Incivility can be insidious or blatant, resulting in staff dissatisfaction and turnover; which can lead to resident and family dissatisfaction.  With our attention focused on culture change and person-centered care, we are ready to take the next step and move our organizations away from incivility to civility.  This interactive presentation will provide you with a better understanding of incivility and the tools you can use to move from incivility to civility.

Participants will be able to:

  • List 2 qualities that define civility;
  • Name 2 ways incivility impacts teamwork; and
  • Identify 2 steps the participant can take to move from incivility to civility using tools created by The Eden Alternative.

Learning Level: Intermediate

Living Environment: SN, AL, CCRC/LPC


CC1B: Healing Dementia

Kyrié Carpenter, Contributor and Tour Cast Member, ChangingAging.org

Culture change starts with the heart. This session begins with visual art, music, and spoken word to crack open hearts and engage ways of knowing outside of cognition. From this open space, participants will explore a counter perspective to mainstream notions about dementia as only a disease to be cured. Participants will also discover:  1) How to cultivate our own Elderhood by learning from those who live with dementia; and 2) How cultivating Elderhood at every age alleviates suffering for both people experiencing cognitive change and their allies.

Participants will be able to:

  • List 2 qualities of a holistic perspective of dementia;
  • Identify 2 aspects of the concept of life cycle development, as it relates to the participant’s life; and
  • Name 2 things that people living with dementia have taught the participant that changed their world view.

Learning Level: Intermediate

Living Environment: SN, AL, SH, CCRC/LPC, SmRC, HCBS


CC1C: Well-Being as the Driver of Physical Environment

Robert Simonetti, Senior Associate/Design Director, SWBR

This session will provide a framework for employing the Eden Alternative Domains of Well Being™ as a catalyst for creating meaningful living environments that promote well-being. When we measure physical environmental needs against these seven Domains, we design living places that reach beyond satisfying basic needs for shelter.  We “create home” in every sense of the word, as opposed to “home-like.” This session will employ case studies and participant input to explore those physical characteristics that support well-being. Case studies and conversations will focus on both new construction and simple renovations to existing institutional buildings.

Participants will be able to:

  • Identify 2 reasons that current institutional approaches to physical design have come into being;
  • Name 2 ways that the Eden Alternative Domains of Well-Being™ can frame the physical environment; and
  • List 2 examples of case study evidence affirming the relevance of these Domains to physical design.

Learning Level: Advanced

Living Environment: SN, AL, SH, CCRC/LPC, SmRC


CC1D: Ageism: Recognizing and Destroying the Weed Sabotaging Your Culture Change Journey

Mel Coppola, Owner/ Consultant, Hearts in Care, LLC

It’s disguised in jokes, movies, music, and advertising.  From years of internalizing these messages, it gets buried deep within us.  Ageism is the last socially accepted form of prejudice and a global multi-billion dollar industry.  Society views aging in terms of loss, decline and worthlessness.  By shifting this focus to the gifts that Elders have to offer us, we empower all care partners to create healthier lives for themselves and those for whom they care.  This session will explore how ageism’s underlying effects can damage a culture change journey and how to pluck this invasive weed by its root.

Participants will be able to:

  • List 3 examples of ageism in the participant’s workplace or in the greater community;
  • Transform 2 ageist attitudes into strength-based perceptions about aging; and
  • Identify 2 “Anti-Ageism Ambassadors” to help implement an “Anti-Ageism” action plan.

Learning Level: Intermediate

Living Environment: SN, SH, CCRC/LPC, SmRC, HCBS


CC1E: Open Studio, Open Mind: Tuesdays with Artists at the Tower

Molly Levine-Hunt, Caregiver Support Services Manager, Jewish Family & Career Services

Joined by their greatest fans – a social worker and an art therapist – a group of Elders meets every Tuesday in the rec room of their independent living community for 2 hours of creative, judgment-free art making, socializing, and companionship. After 22 years, this art group has grown, shrunk, and transformed, but all the while, has remained a safe space for creatives to come together and get messy.

Participants will be able to:

  • Define expressive art therapy;
  • List 2 goals of expressive art therapy; and
  • Name 2 qualities of their own expressive art experience explored during the session.

Learning Level: Intermediate

Living Environment: SN, AL, SH, CCRC/LPC, SmRC, HCBS


CC1F: Relationships and Volunteer Community Programs: An Answer for Dementia

Daphne Johnston, Respite Ministry, First United Methodist Church

Learn about a community-based care model involving volunteers trained to offer those living with dementia and their care partners a daily respite from the strain of 24-7 care. The Respite Ministry in Montgomery, AL, provided over 12,000 volunteer hours last year to stimulate, motivate, and provide a sense of purpose for individuals living with dementia. This model averages 25 participants a day and 15 volunteers, four days a week. Relationships with volunteers provide meaning and connection that families are desperate for along their journey. There is no medicine that can fight isolation; the answer is love and support from peers.

Participants will be able to:

  • Identify 2 characteristics of the Volunteer Model (VM) for RESPITE Ministry;
  • Name 2 ways the VM Model has value for those it serves; and
  • Determine 2 qualities of a strong development plan for a proposed volunteer, respite model.

Learning Level: Advanced

Living Environment: HCBS


CC1G: Convivium: Nourishing the Human Spirit at Mealtime

Nancy Smyth, Executive Director, Rochester Presbyterian Home

Three balanced meals a day and an evening snack… this standard complies with the state regulations for nursing homes and assisted living residences.  While the regulations require dietician approval and adherence to physician’s orders, there is nothing to regulate conversation, fellowship, or laughter.  Too often, these ingredients are missing from meals.  This session will provide a recipe for creating convivium at meals: Good food, good company, and good conversation.  Mealtime should be characterized by a sense of familiarity and comfort that nourishes human spirit, as well as the human body.

Participants will be able to:

  • Identify 2 vital steps involved in forming an improvement team for the meal experience;
  • Name 2 ways that the improvement team can support the development of improvement strategies; and
  • List 2 aspects of a strong action plan for implementing the strategies and evaluating their effectiveness.

Learning Level: Intermediate

Living Environment: SN, AL, SH, SmRC, HCBS


CC1H: The Impact of Technology on Creating a Resident-Centric Philosophy of Engagement

Jack York, President, It’s Never 2 Late
Carolyn Lookabill, Brand Ambassador, American Senior Magazine

All of us, regardless of age, strive to stay meaningfully engaged in life. Engagement is not a natural result of “being there.” Just because someone is in the room does not mean that they are engaged in the moment. This session, geared towards non-technical professionals, examines how technology can provide an ideal solution.  We examine a variety of technologies that help people stay engaged and connected regardless of where they are in the wellness continuum.  We provide examples of how these technologies are being deployed in senior living. Today these experiences are considered innovative, tomorrow they will be demanded.

Participants will be able to:

  • List 2 types of interactive technologies that can be adapted for individuals at all levels of senior living;
  • Identify 2 ways that senior living providers have helped staff integrate person-centered technology as a tool to improve activity and therapy programming; and
  • Determine 2 benefits of technology-based approaches as a part of person-centered initiatives.

Learning Level: Advanced

Living Environment: SN, AL, CCRC/LPC


Concurrent Sessions #2 (Saturday, 10:15 am-11:15 am)

CC2A: My Life Plan: Planning for Abundant Life with the Eden Alternative Domains of Well-Being

Deb Schick, Leader of Professional Practice, Sherbrooke Community Centre
Robin Kitchen, Leader of Education, Sherbrooke Community Centre

The shift from the medical model of care to a person-directed approach to care can be challenging for employee care partners. Using reflection, care partners will be guided to see the role the Eden Alternative Domains of Well-Being play in their own lives.  Having them compare and contrast their opportunities for well-being with those of their Elder care partners is powerful.  Using the Domains in care planning helps focus the attention of care staff to supporting the creation of a better life for Elders they serve.  A new “My Life Plan” will be presented.

Participants will be able to:

  • List 2 ways that the 7 Domains of Well-Being play a role in the participants’ own lives;
  • Name 2 reasons why it’s important to shift to a model of care based on well-being; and
  • Identify 2 ways to apply the Domains of Well-Being to care planning.

Learning Level: Advanced

Living Environment: SN, AL, SH, CCRC/LPC, SmRC, HCBS


CC2B: Putting “Home” Back in Nursing Home: One Community’s Person-Directed Journey

Deke Cateau, Chief Operating Officer, A.G. Rhodes Health & Rehab
Sonya Williams, Recreation Therapist and Activities Director, A.G. Rhodes Health & Rehab 

While an increasing number of Eldercare settings are incorporating person-directed principles and practices, challenges remain for some skilled nursing providers to implement this improved model of care amidst a sea of regulatory and other challenges. A.G. Rhodes, a nonprofit nursing home organization in Atlanta, is proving that overcoming barriers is possible, and the person-directed movement is gaining impressive momentum throughout this 115-year-old organization. Explore lessons learned and tips for introducing The Eden Alternative in a nursing home setting; and how through effective leadership, teamwork, communication and most importantly, patience, any organization can successfully adopt and tailor the Eden Alternative philosophy.

Participants will be able to:

  • Name 2 ways one can garner leadership support for implementing person-directed care;
  • Determine 2 strategies for identifying and building on person-directed successes; and
  • Identify the top 3 perceived barriers to successful implementation of person-directed care

Learning Level: Novice

Living Environment: SN


CC2C:  Employee Education: A Practical (and Fun) Toolbox

Bonny Claxton, Chief Financial Officer/Eden Associates Coordinator, Rochester Presbyterian Home
Lisa Patnode, Engagement Specialist, Rochester Presbyterian Home
Carolyn Roorda, Quality Assurance/Compliance Director, Rochester Presbyterian Home 

Rochester Presbyterian Home has studied the Ten Principles of The Eden Alternative and the Eden Alternative Domains of Well-Being™ for many years. Our Eden Associates Team meets regularly to learn and develop activities, games, and projects to engage staff in learning practical ways to understand the three plagues of the human spirit and implement personalized application of their antidotes to alleviate suffering.  Session participants will experience this educational toolbox and how each tool relates to relieving the three plagues and applying the Domains of Well-Being. Participants will also receive educational templates that they can take home and implement.

Participants will be able to:

  • Name 2 ways one can garner leadership support for implementing person-directed care;
  • Determine 2 strategies for identifying and building on person-directed successes; and
  • Identify the top 3 perceived barriers to successful implementation of person-directed care

Learning Level: Intermediate

Living Environment: SN, AL, SH, CCRC/LPC, SmRC, HCBS 


CC2D: Alzheimer’s: Up Close and Personal

Brian LeBlanc, Advisory Board Member, Dementia Action Alliance

Alzheimer’s: Up Close and Personal is a journey, starting with the early signs of Alzheimer’s Disease, leading up to and including my diagnosis. The actual diagnosis process is painful to speak of, due to the impersonal and unprofessional treatment I received. Yet,  it must be told for educational and training purposes.  The session will also cover living with loss and stigma, both positive and negative impacts on family life, and the vital role of engagement and empowerment.

Participants will be able to:

  • Name 2 early signs of dementia-related conditions;
  • List 2 ways impersonal, clinical interactions differ from person-directed interactions; and
  • Identify 2 person-directed approaches to living with Alzheimer’s disease.

Learning Level: Novice

Living Environment: SN, AL, SH, CCRC/LPC, SmRC, HCBS


CC2E: Human Habitats Reach Beyond Four Walls: RISING UP To Grow Change at the State Level

Kim McRae, President, Have a Good Life
Walter Coffey, Managing Partner, WD International LLC 

There are many variables involved in creating a person-directed culture of care.  In order to grow and deepen the culture change movement, it’s imperative that all care services expand the reach of their change efforts beyond their own doors. This workshop will lay out the pathway culture change advocates used in Georgia to expand the movement throughout the state including: 1) How to engage stakeholders; 2) How to engage the full spectrum of aging service providers; and 3) How to build on stories of recent successes with leaders in state government.

Participants will be able to:

  • Name 2 vital steps for launching a coordinated statewide culture change initiative;
  • Identify at least 2 stakeholder groups that should be included in a statewide strategy for change; and
  • List 2 examples of statewide endeavors to advance culture change ideals.

Learning Level: Intermediate

Living Environment: SN, AL, SH, CCRC/LPC, SmRC, HCBS


CC2F: Aging with Purpose: Reconnecting Elders with Meaning

Melissa Smith, Director of Innovation and Initiative, Senior Services, Inc.

Inspired by Gwande’s Being Mortal, Senior Services, Inc. of Winston Salem, NC started their culture change journey in 2015, when 20 employees and community leaders were trained as Certified Eden at Home Associates.  A year and a half later, we have trained 90 employees, 6 community partners and 15 families, while also enrolling 200 Elders in our award-winning Aging with Purpose pilot project. Aging with Purpose examines a common missing piece of care for homebound Elders – the basic human need to experience meaning as we age.  Our session will review strengths we have developed, as well as replicable strategies from Aging with Purpose.

Participants will be able to:

  • List 2 ways one can transform relationships and interactions with homebound Elders;
  • Name 2 important impacts the Living History interview has on members of the care partner team; and
  • Identify 2 “Aging with Purpose” strategies that can be easily replicated in the participants’ organizations.

Learning Level: Intermediate

Living Environment: HCBS


CC2G:  NextAge Mississippi: Serving Elders Beyond Our Doors

Michelle Daniel, VP of Philanthropy and Strategic Implementation, Methodist Senior Services

NextAge Mississippi™ was developed and is operated by Mississippi Methodist Senior Services, Inc. NextAge Mississippi™ is a “one-stop resource” that provides information, support, services, and relationships for older Mississippians and their families as they grow and live into Elderhood – their next age.

Participants will be able to:

  • List 2 ways one can assess the service and support needs of Elders in the broader community;
  • Name 2 strategies for developing collaborative community partnerships designed to meet needs; and
  • Identify at least 2 possible areas of service development that might help form a framework for coordinated service delivery.

Learning Level: Advanced

Living Environment: SN, AL, SH, CCRC/LPC


CC2H: It’s OK Not to Be OK: Dealing with Compassion Fatigue

Phillip Ramey, Director of Spirituality/Chaplain, Riverview HealthCARE Center
Melissa Allen, CEO/Administrator, Riverview HealthCARE Center

Compassion fatigue is the often unrecognized downside to providing care. Not recognizing and dealing with the symptoms of compassion fatigue can lead to many emotional and psychological problems for any care partner. This session will help you define compassion fatigue, identify the characteristics, as well as ways to assist someone dealing with compassion fatigue.

Participants will be able to:

  • Define compassion fatigue;
  • Identify 2 characteristics of compassion fatigue; and
  • List 3 ways you could assist someone experiencing compassion fatigue.

Learning Level: Intermediate

Living Environment: SN, AL, SH, CCRC/LPC, SmRC, HCBS


Concurrent Sessions #3 (Saturday, 11:30 am-12:30 pm)

CC3A: How I Learned to Love Facebook: Our Human Habitat and the Media

Eric Anderson, Communications Leader, Sherbrooke Community Centre

Every resident at Sherbrooke has a story to tell, but how can we best share with the world? In this interactive presentation, Communications Leader, Eric Anderson, from Sherbrooke Community Centre will explain the many ways social media can be an effective and fun way to tell Elders’ stories.  As a former journalist, Eric will offer tips on how to work with traditional media, such as newspaper and TV reporters, to ensure your story is told truthfully. Participants must have a smartphone, complete with the free Splice Video Editing App, with them.

Participants will be able to:

  • List 2 important steps for starting an organizational Facebook page;
  • Name 2 things journalists are looking for in a story; and
  • Identify 2 qualities of a brief, effective video clip for social media.

Learning Level: Intermediate

Living Environment: SN, AL, SH, CCRC/LPC, SmRC, HCBS


CC3B: Opposites Attract: Balancing Acute Care with Personal Choice

Kimberly Ziegler, Director of Education, St. Ann’s Community
Triciajean Jones, Director of Life Enrichment, St. Ann’s Community

Long-term care is focusing more on the needs of older people who live with frailty. Balancing the challenges of acute care with a commitment to person-directedness can be tricky. The following Eden Alternative Principles are key to working through these situations: an Elder-centered community is an opportunity to give as well as receive care; medical treatment should be the servant of genuine human caring and never its master; and human growth must never be separated from human life.  This session, will present a resident scenario, from both a risk and a choice perspective, with these three Principles serving as touchstones.

Participants will be able to:

  • List 2 impacts of acute care that lacks a foundation in person-directed approaches ;
  • Name 2 reasons why it is important to balance risk with cholce; and
  • Identify 2 ways to uphold the Eden Alternative Principles in the face of an urgent situation.

Learning Level: Intermediate

Living Environment: SN, AL, CCRC/LPC


CC3C: Improving Connectedness Through Well-being: Residential Care Home to Fitness Club

Dayna Pert, Operations Manager, Kumeu Village Aged Care, Ltd
Georgia Pert, Administration Manager/Fitness Coach, Kumeu Village Aged Care, Ltd 

This program developed out of concern for the growing boredom, declining mobility, changing independence levels, and the fitness needs of the Elders, as well as the fitness needs of their employee care partners. Limited access to the necessary expertise, equipment, resources, and community services has many negative outcomes/financial costs for any aged care home and its community. Our innovation was to initiate a fully integrated and accessible health and well-being program for residents, staff, families, and the wider community through our fitness center, staff education and empowerment, and innovative equipment.

Participants will be able to:

  • Name 2 challenges for Elders and employees in terms of declining health capacity;
  • Identify 2 opportunities for growth, regarding fitness and well-being in residential care homes; and
  • List 2 practical strategies for promoting fitness and well-being that can be implemented within a residential care home setting.

Learning Level: Advanced

Living Environment: SN, AL, SH, SmRC, HCBS


CC3D: Can Hospitality Create Home?

Jill Vitale-Aussem, Chief Operating Officer, Cappella Living Solutions

Hospitality has become a very popular topic in our field. Communities featuring bistros and beer taps and the amenities of a fine hotel are popping up all around the country.  While the hospitality model has encouraged freedom and choice in services, higher quality dining experiences, and less institutional designs, simply applying the concept, philosophy and operational structure of a hotel or resort can actually undermine our battle against loneliness, helplessness, and boredom. This presentation takes a critical look at this model and explores opportunities for using hospitality in a balanced way to enhance our communities.

Participants will be able to:

  • Name 2 ways that the hotel service delivery model contrasts with the Eden Alternative’s approach to creating home;
  • List 2 concerns of a hotel-inspired customer service model; and
  • Identify 2 ways that hospitality can be used in a balanced manner.

Learning Level: Intermediate

Living Environment: SN, AL, SH, CCRC/LPC, SmRC, HCBS


CC3E: Freeing Elders Living with Dementia

Amy Ivy, Administrator, Dunbar Village
Lanette Williams, Administrator, PeachTree Village 

This session will cover the journeys of two organizations that decided to take on the challenge of Dr. Al Power, and free the Elders living with dementia. As change agents, we are called to remove restraints for all Elders, including those living with dementia. Walk with us through our journeys of removing the doors of the “locked memory care units.”  Participants will explore and discuss how “locked units” qualify as a bona fide restraint, as well as the challenges, perceived barriers, and victories experienced when we freed the Elders and truly took a giant step forward in creating community.

Participants will be able to:

  • Name 2 ways that secured or locked communities for people who live with dementia qualify as a restraint;
  • List 2 barriers that SentryCare homes have experienced in their efforts to remove locked access.; and
  • Identify 2 specific victories that make the journey to remove the locked doors worthwhile.

Learning Level: Intermediate

Living Environment: SN, AL, CCRC/LPC


CC3F: Incorporating Volunteers as Community Partners and Care Partners

Cathy Winer, Director of Volunteer Services, Calhoun County Medical Care Facility
Elizabeth Raleigh, Life Enrichment Director, Calhoun County Medical Care Facility 

Change starts here! Does your home echo with the voices of children? Do your Elders teach students to read? Are your Elders engaged in your larger community? Amazing things happen when volunteers become care partners. Join us to learn the many secrets of how volunteers can contribute to the lifeblood of your home. Together, we will inspire you to connect with new volunteers, foster current relationships, empower others, and engage with your community!  We believe there is a volunteer care partner for every Elder.

Participants will be able to:

  • Name at least 3 community resources for volunteer recruitment or potential collaborative partnerships;
  • List 4 steps involved in growing a new volunteer care partner; and
  • Identify at least 3 practices designed to help retain volunteer care partners.

Learning Level: Advanced

Living Environment: SN, AL, CCRC/LPC, HCBS


CC3G: Consistent Assignments: Why? When? How?

Sharolyn Flemons, Director of Nursing and Health Care Services, St. George Village
Mark Lowell, Executive Director, St. George Village 

This session will feature an important aspect of person-directed care that often challenges organizations, while also creating some of the greatest opportunities for advancement of their culture change journey.  Consistent assignments offer leaders opportunities for team development, interprofessional collaboration, and care partner empowerment, resulting in positive outcomes for all key stakeholders. Best practices support adoption of this culture change initiative for development of meaningful relationships, delivery of safe, quality care, better job satisfaction, stronger morale and lower staff turnover rates.

Participants will be able to:

  • Name 2 positive outcomes of implementing consistent assignments;
  • List 2 strategies for determining the best timing for implementing consistent assignments; and
  • Identify 2 aspects of a strong plan for initiating the consistent assignment process.

Learning Level: Intermediate

Living Environment: SN, AL, CCRC/LPC


CC3H: Growing Eden: Creating Community for Our Elders

James Lyon, Life Enhancement Director, Colorow Care Center
Jacqueline Davis, Public Relations Director, Colorow Care Center

The Eden Alternative Philosophy teaches us that a sense of identity, meaning, and connectedness are vital to our well-being, no matter how old we are or what our abilities may be.  To support these aspects of well-being, employee care partners must be committed to supporting each individual’s need for purposeful engagement.  This includes facilitating meaningful relationships between Elders and the broader community.  Participants will explore strategies for co-creating a rich sense of community with and for the Elders they serve by cultivating connections both within and beyond the doors of their living environment.

Participants will be able to:

  • Name 2 impactful ways to engage community-based partners in care;
  • Identify at least 2 important aspects of an interdisciplinary plan to cultivate a deeper sense of community; and
  • List 2 ways that the Elders themselves can be empowered to cultivate community relationships.

Learning Level:  Intermediate

Living Environment: SN