Breakout Session A

Tuesday, April 28, 2020 from 10:30 am – Noon

A1: Raising the Bar: Standards of Practice for Person- and Relationship-Centered Dementia Care

Karen Love, Executive Director, Dementia Action Alliance
Laura Beck, Learning and Development Guide, The Eden Alternative
Al Power, Schlegel Chair in Aging and Dementia Innovation, University of Waterloo Research Institute for Aging
Jennifer Carson, Director, Dementia Engagement, Education and Research Program, University of Nevada Reno
Brian Van Buren, International Dementia Advocate and Speaker

Person and relationship-centered principles and practices are considered the gold standard globally, yet there are no generally accepted standards or guidelines for dementia support. The absence of accepted standards/guidelines creates a confusing landscape for what these principles and practices are and how to implement them. The Dementia Action Alliance and The Eden Alternative partnered in 2018 to address this important gap along with a diverse, talented group of individuals living with dementia and other specialists. Participants will experience and engage in a panel discussion about establishing appropriate specifications for dementia-specific standards of practice that put the person first.

Attendees will be able to:

  • Identify 2 qualities of an inclusive process for establishing standards of practice.
  • Name 2 key specifications for an effective set of innovative standards of practice.
  • List 2 challenges experienced in the process of establishing person- and relationship-centered standards of practices for dementia support.

Dementia Care Track

Suggested for: Formal Leaders, Decision-makers; Elders, Families, Volunteer Care Partners; Skilled Nursing; Assisted Living; Small Residential Care Settings and/or Host Homes; Employee Care Partners; Senior Housing; CCRC/Life Plan Communities; Home & Community-based Services


A2: Working in Long-Term Care:  It Takes a Special Nurse, AND YOU ARE!

Joan Devine, Director of Education, Pioneer Network
Penny Cook, President & CEO, Pioneer Network

Being a nurse in long-term care requires a special skill set. Nurses need more than just clinical skills; they need skills that support their ability to serve as leaders in a person-centered culture and ensure that medical care is “the servant of genuine human caring, never its master” (Principle Seven of The Eden Alternative). Gerontological nursing is a specialty that many nurses, both outside and even within long-term care, don’t fully understand or appreciate. So, fellow nurses (and those who support us) – until we recognize and take pride in who we are and what we do, how can we expect others to do the same?

Attendees will be able to:

  • Identify 2 challenges unique to nursing in a long-term care setting.
  • List 2 principles of gerontological nursing, as it relates to culture change in long-term care.
  • Name 2 ways that nursing professionals can promote and grow gerontological nurses as person-centered leaders.

Workforce Engagement Track

Suggested for: Formal Leaders, Decision-makers; Skilled Nursing; Assisted Living; CCRC/Life Plan Communities


A3: Sherbrooke’s 5 Keys to Unlocking the Door to Lasting Change

Suellen Beatty, CEO, Sherbrooke Community Society Inc.
Kim Schmidt, Leader Resident Care Services, Sherbrooke Community Centre
Jill Vitale-Aussem, President & CEO, The Eden Alternative

In this session, the President & CEO of The Eden Alternative will interview Sherbrooke Community Centre leaders to discuss the 5 key strategies that have guided their successful culture change journey. The recipe for the “Sherbrooke Secret Sauce” for lasting change, which helped them achieve Path to Mastery Milestone 4 status, will be shared so others can replicate the Sherbrooke experience in their own communities. Participants will engage in discussion and leave inspired, equipped and renewed on their culture change journey to create an Elder-centered community, where well-being is the destination for all.

Attendees will be able to:

  • List 5 key strategies for growing a constructive culture.
  • Identify 2 specific strategies that they can apply in their organization.

Leadership Track

Suggested for: Formal Leaders, Decision-makers; Elders, Families, Volunteer Care Partners; Skilled Nursing; Assisted Living; Small Residential Care Settings and/or Host Homes; Employee Care Partners; Senior Housing; CCRC/Life Plan Communities; Home & Community-Based Services


A4: Technology as a Tool for Mind, Body and Spirit

Jack York, Founder and President, It’s Never 2 Late
Nancy Fox, Consultant, Author, and Educator

Senior living has undergone radical transformations over the last decade – changes that have impacted dining, nursing, architecture, and wellness. But often, the resident’s soul and spirit have been left out of the equation. This session will dive deeply into the power of engagement, specifically from an Eden Alternative perspective. You will see how a variety of person focused technologies can empower older adults, regardless of their physical and cognitive abilities, to stay connected, engaged and, most importantly, relevant. This session is 100% aimed at non-techie folks. Prepare to walk away optimistic about the future of aging.

Attendees will be able to:

  • Identify 2 examples of engagement technology.
  • Define 2 ways that engagement technology aligns with the Eden Alternative Ten Principles.
  • List 2 examples of outcome-based research demonstrating the value of engagement technology.

Suggested for: Formal Leaders, Decision-makers; Elders, Families, Volunteer Care Partners; Skilled Nursing; Assisted Living; Small Residential Care Settings and/or Host Homes; Employee Care Partners; Senior Housing; CCRC/Life Plan Communities; Home & Community-Based Services


A5: Regulations and Resident-Centered Care: Old Wine, New Bottles?

Jennifer Hilliard, Of Counsel, Arnall Golden Gregory LLP
Alan Horowitz, Partner, Arnall Golden Gregory LLP
Carmen Bowman, Owner, Edu-Catering

The journey toward resident-centered care began in 1987 with the promulgation of regulations in response to the Federal Nursing Home Reform Act, better known as OBRA ’87. Fast forward to 2016, which saw CMS undertake a major overhaul of those regulations, in part to emphasize a more resident-centric approach. Though much was accomplished in the 2016 regulations to further the culture change principles at the heart of the Eden Alternative, significant tension between fiscal and regulatory oversight, and the simple desire of elders to live a more fulfilled life, remains. This session touches upon the evolution of nursing home regulations following OBRA ’87, then examines how the 2016 regulations successfully incorporate basic Eden Alternative principles in some surprising ways, followed by a look at the challenges associated with emerging issues and changing the enforcement culture, as well as the role played by risk-based alternative payment models in driving change.

Attendees will be able to:

  • Name 2 ways that culture change, as reflected in the 2016 regulations, dovetails with the Eden Alternative approach.
  • Specify 2 areas where culture change and regulation clash.
  • Identify 2 impacts that payment systems and risk-based alternative payment models, such as ACOs, may have on the culture change movement going forward.

Suggested for: Skilled Nursing


A6: Supporting Families: The Good, The Bad & The Ugly

Karen Stobbe, Chief Purpose Officer, In the Moment

What is the relationship between your staff and the families of those who live in your care community? Do they have one?  What is going on with families, and how can we support them? How can we build connections with this underserved and under-utilized part of our team? We will explore ways to help families be in partnership with you.

Attendees will be able to:

  • Establish 3 reasons why family members may be suffering from mood shifts.
  • Evaluate 3 ways that your move-in process may be improved.
  • List 3 ways that families can be a part of your team.

Suggested for: Formal Leaders, Decision-makers; Elders, Families, Volunteer Care Partners; Skilled Nursing; Assisted Living; Small Residential Care Settings and/or Host Homes; Employee Care Partners; CCRC/Life Plan Communities


A7: Foundations of Trauma-Informed Care (Part 1)

Lisa Kendall, Proprietor, Lisa Kendall Counseling & Consulting

This workshop focuses on the human experience of trauma, and how organizations can utilize an evidence-based, trauma-informed care approach to create safe environments for consumers and staff alike. We will explore useful definitions of unresolved trauma and trauma-informed care, along with a case study to bring the issue to life. We will also identify immediately accessible resources to support your implementation team, while you meet CMS regulations and look at evidence-based tools to assess the organization, staff, and Elders in a way that avoids re-traumatization. Learn how to support survivors, as they make peace with painful memories, affirm strengths, and continue to grow.

Attendees will be able to:

  • List 3 benefits of resolving painful memories in Elderhood.
  • Name 3 ways trauma might keep an Elder from experiencing well-being.
  • Identify 3 action steps you will take in the next two weeks to advance trauma-informed care approaches at your organization.

Trauma-Informed Care Track

Suggested for: Formal Leaders, Decision-makers; Skilled Nursing; Assisted Living; Small Residential Care Settings and/or Host Homes; Employee Care Partners; CCRC/Life Plan Communities; Home & Community-Based Services


A8: Culture Change: It Makes Business Cents!

Angie McAllister, Director of Quality of Life and Culture Change, Signature HealthCare
Chris Cox, COO, Signature HealthCARE

In this session, you will learn why culture change is not only the right thing to do for Elders, but also why it’s the right thing to do for your business! You will learn the business case for culture change, including a review of financial impact data points and clinical measures through the application of the Eden Alternative Ten Principles. Come and learn from the Signature HealthCARE team how changing organizational systems and processes strengthens the business and improves the lives of Elders and their care partners.

Attendees will be able to:

  • Name 2 ways that the Eden Alternative Ten Principles can be applied to strategic initiatives that bring innovation to the entire organization.
  • Identify 2 best practices used by Signature HealthCARE teams that can help them create new culture change initiatives.
  • Apply at least 2 of the Eden Alternative Ten Principles to financial and clinical outcomes.

Leadership Track

Suggested for: Formal Leaders, Decision-makers; Skilled Nursing; Assisted Living; Employee Care Partners; CCRC/Life Plan Communities


A9: Clermont College: Creating a Culture of Growth

Andrew Sharp, PhD student/Adjunct Faculty, Graduate School of Social Work, University of Denver, and Christian Living Communities, Clermont Park
Shirley Brown, Christian Living Communities, Clermont Park
Mikaela Craig, Christian Living Communities, Clermont Park
Mac McLennan, Christian Living Communities, Clermont Park

In 2013, residents and associates at Clermont Park in Denver gathered together with the goal of creating learning opportunities that leverage the talent within the community. This was in response to a question raised by a resident named Elsa: “With all these amazing people living here, why don’t we start a university?” Clermont College was created and has been a driving force within the community since. Come hear more from CP associates and residents about “the College,” where residents, associates, and guests have taught about their passions and interests, learned from others and grown in meaningful ways in the process.

Attendees will be able to:

  • Name 2 ways to engage Elders in creating and nourishing an environment full of meaningful, purposeful opportunities.
  • List 2 tools they can use to support residents and associates in an endeavor similar to Clermont College.
  • Identify 2  benefits of creating a culture of growth.

Suggested for: Formal Leaders, Decision-makers; Elders, Families, Volunteer Care Partners; Skilled Nursing; Assisted Living; Small Residential Care Settings and/or Host Homes; Employee Care Partners; Senior Housing; CCRC/Life Plan Communities; Home & Community-Based Services