Breakout Session E

Wednesday, April 29, 2020 from 1:00 to 2:30pm OR 1:00 to 2:00pm

90-MINUTE SESSIONS:

E1: Dementia Emancipated: Practical Pathways to Inclusion (Part 2)

Jennifer Carson, Director, Dementia Engagement, Education and Research Program, University of Nevada Reno
Al Power, Schlegel Chair in Aging and Dementia Innovation, University of Waterloo Research Institute for Aging
Jessica Luh Kim, Dementia Task Force Member, Ontario Retirement Communities Association (ORCA)

Challenging the locked and segregated ‘memory care’ model, in Part-2 of this two-part session, we will highlight several innovative, practice-based examples from providers who are either making strides or leading the way to dementia inclusion, including initiatives from: Carol Woods Retirement Community, Sentry Care and the Ontario Retirement Communities Association. We will describe how each of these organizations utilized a collaborative approach to support the well-being and inclusion of Elders living with dementia. We will also describe their respective research and evaluation efforts. Together, these organizations help demonstrate that dementia inclusion is not just a possibility – it is a reality – and this session details a number of positive and practical pathways all providers can take to make this reality the new norm.

Attendees will be able to:

  • List 2 inclusion-friendly best practices.
  • Name 2 enablers of inclusion.
  • Identify 2 aspects of a positive pathway to inclusion.

Dementia Care Track

Suggested for: Formal Leaders, Decision-makers; Elders, Families, Volunteer Care Partners; Skilled Nursing; Assisted Living; Small Residential Care Settings and/or Host Homes; Employee Care Partners; Senior Housing; CCRC/Life Plan Communities; Adult Day Programs


E2: Leveraging Relationships: A Leadership Super Power

Angie McAllister, Director of Quality of Life and Culture Change, Signature HealthCare
Ryan Myracle, Culture Change Resources Manager, Signature HealthCARE

Are you a corporate leader with a vision of driving person-directed care in your organization? Are you at your wit’s end with sustaining change processes? Join us as we share ways to apply person-directed care leadership competencies to hardwire your organizational change practices. Learn how corporate leadership teams can not only drive lasting change, but improve overall culture through the power of relationships.

Attendees will be able to:

  • Name 2 ways that corporate leadership relates to driving culture.
  • Identify 2 competencies that top leaders can learn to drive organizational change through relationships.
  • List 2 person-directed care leadership competencies designed to support the sustainability of change efforts.

Leadership Track

Suggested for: Formal Leaders, Decision-makers; Skilled Nursing; Assisted Living; Small Residential Care Settings and/or Host Homes; Senior Housing; CCRC/Life Plan Communities


E3: Living Out Loud With Dementia and Finding Purpose

Jytte Lokvig, Founder, Alzheimer’s Café
Susan Balkman, Assistant, Alzheimer’s Café

We all thrive with purpose and socialization. This is especially important for people living with dementia, who often find themselves isolated and no longer feeling like contributing members of their community. The Alzheimer’s Café offers an opportunity to be in a public space, a judgment-free and relaxed gathering of people living with dementia and their care partners. In this experiential session, Susan will address the importance of purpose in her life with dementia and you’ll try no-fail projects enjoyed at cafés as well as activity programs in many communities, as they are appropriate and enjoyable regardless of the cognitive abilities of the participants.

Attendees will be able to:

  • Identify 2 ways that purpose impacts the well-being of an individual living with dementia.
  • Name 2 obstacles faced by individuals living with dementia.
  • List 2 benefits of group engagement for people living with dementia.

Dementia Care Track

Suggested for: Formal Leaders, Decision-makers; Elders, Families, Volunteer Care Partners; Skilled Nursing; Assisted Living; Small Residential Care Settings and/or Host Homes; CCRC/Life Plan Communities; Home & Community-Based Services


E4: Polypharmacy and Elders Living with Frailty – A Common Sense Approach

Brian Steeves, MD, Medical Director, RK McDonald Nursing Home

This session will improve recognition of frailty and its importance when care planning.  Session content will highlight evidence-informed guidelines for diabetes, hypertension, UTIs, hyperlipidemia, depression and personal expressions (sometimes referenced as “behaviors”) common for persons living with more advanced dementia and/or frailty. This population will also be the focus of a discussion that outlines a common sense approach to medication use in general. The presentation will conclude by providing a detailed approach to end-of-life care, which allows Elders to have a peaceful and dignified death.

Attendees will be able to:

  • Name 2 identifying characteristics of frailty.
  • Specify 2 ways to reduce medication use for Elders living with frailty.
  • Identify 2 aspects of a person-directed approach to end-of-life care.

Suggested for: Formal Leaders, Decision-makers; Elders, Families, Volunteer Care Partners; Skilled Nursing; Assisted Living


E5: Reach Your Peak: Become a Top Workplace

Mary Helton, Corporate Human Resources Director, A.G. Rhodes Health & Rehab
Mary Newton, Chief Communications Officer, A.G. Rhodes Health & Rehab

Eldercare providers everywhere are facing workforce challenges, but there are steps that employers can take to not only improve recruitment and retention, but become a top workplace. A.G. Rhodes, a nonprofit nursing home organization in Atlanta, is proving that successfully addressing workforce challenges is possible without a big budget. Through practical tips, examples, and interactive opportunities, attendees will learn how they can use collaboration, communication, and creativity to rise to the top as an employer of choice.

Attendees will be able to:

  • Identify 2 ways to secure key partnerships (internal and external) designed to support your workforce retention strategy.
  • Name 2 employee communication techniques that support your retention strategy.
  • List 2 creative tactics to address workforce development challenges.

Workforce Engagement Track

Suggested for: Formal Leaders, Decision-Makers; Assisted Living; Small Residential Care Settings and/or Host Homes; Employee Care Partners; Senior Housing; CCRC/Life Plan Communities; Organizations that desire to be an employer of choice


60-MINUTE SESSIONS:

E6: Mother and Daughter, Facing Life’s Last Chapters Together, An Empowerment Dialogue

Patricia Bortz, Speaker and Retired Attorney, Facing Last Chapters
Libby Bortz, Licensed Clinical Social Worker

This powerfully emotional presentation is about empowering individuals to determine their own destiny.   Acknowledging and sharing with loved ones what matters most in life and death underscores the ways we can live and navigate the later years of life.  Avoiding the conversation lessens this opportunity and may cause others to make stress-based decisions, substituting their own judgment for their loved one. This session models the conversation between mother and daughter, highlighting the importance of having it sooner, rather than later. We provide numerous ways to start the discussion where there is reluctance and avoidance involved.

Attendees will be able to:

  • Name 2 reasons why it’s important to proactively discuss our personal wishes for later life.
  • List 2 conversation starters for engaging reluctant friends and family in crucial conversations about aging and dying.
  • Identify 2 additional resources helpful for planning and communicating about aging and dying.

Suggested for: Formal Leaders, Decision-makers; Elders, Families, Volunteer Care Partners; Skilled Nursing; Assisted Living; Small Residential Care Settings and/or Host Homes; Employee Care Partners; Senior Housing; CCRC/Life Plan Communities; Home & Community-Based Services


E7: Applying the Domains of Well-Being to Home Care: Unique Challenges and Tools

Meg Mairn Craig, Owner, Griswold Home Care Pinellas

Serving Elders in their own homes presents unique challenges. How do you create community when someone lives alone? How can employees care partners feel connected to each other, despite working in the field alone? These are only a few of the questions that come to mind. Home care services help millions of Elders age in the homes they have created for themselves. This session reflects on how the Eden Alternative Domains of Well-BeingSM can deepen the role of home care services and position them to help create a life worth living for the people they support.

Attendees will be able to:

  • Name 2 ways that the Eden Alternative Domains of Well-BeingSM are relevant to home care.
  • Identify 2 common obstacles to well-being experienced in home care settings.
  • List 2 strategic approaches for infusing home care practices with the Eden Alternative Domains of Well-BeingSM.

Suggested for: Formal Leaders, Decision-makers; Elders, Families, Volunteer Care Partners; Assisted Living; Small Residential Care Settings and/or Host Homes; Employee Care Partners; Senior Housing; CCRC/Life Plan Communities; Home & Community-Based Services


E8: The Domains of Well-Being as a Driver of Physical Environment

Robert Simonetti, Senior Associate/Design Director, SWBR
Lisa Czolowski, CEO, Hover Senior Living Community

This session will provide a framework for employing the Eden Alternative Domains of Well Being SM as a catalyst for creating meaningful living environments that promote well-being. When we re-frame our physical environmental needs, as measured against the seven Domains, we create living spaces which exceed satisfying basic needs for shelter or just being “home-like”. This session will employ case studies and participant input to explore the physical characteristics which support well-being. Case studies and conversations will discuss relevant new construction options and simple renovations that transform existing institutional buildings.

Attendees will be able to:

  • Name 2 aspects of physical environments that are influenced by the Institutional model of care.
  • Name 2 aspects of a physical environment influenced by the Eden Alternative Domains of Well-BeingSM.
  • Identify 2 case study examples that demonstrate the successful application of the Domains on the physical environment.

Suggested for: Skilled Nursing; Assisted Living; Small Residential Care Settings and/or Host Homes; Senior Housing; CCRC/Life Plan Communities