Breakout Session F

Wednesday, April 29, 2020 from 3:00 to 5:00pm

F1: Opening Doors and Beyond: Meeting Elders’ Needs Through Creative Fundraising

Michelle Daniel, VP of Philanthropy and Leadership Development, Methodist Senior Services
Mary Kim Smith, Executive Director, Wesley Meadows Retirement Community
Kimberly Easterling, NextAge Mississippi Director, Methodist Senior Services

This session will reflect on two initiatives focused on supporting Elders in need. “Open Doors” highlights the census issues at Wesley Manor and how creative thinking and compassion established a win-win situation. Participants will have the opportunity to discuss how they may overcome barriers to benefiting Elders in need. A brief case study on the successes of the benevolence fund created by Methodist Senior Services will also be shared. “Beyond Our Doors” will feature an outreach ministry, NextAge Mississippi, and challenge participants to meet Elders’ needs in their greater community.

Attendees will be able to:

  • List 2 barriers to supporting Elders in need that they will need remove.
  • Identify 2 fundraising options that will help keep Elders in their current social network (regardless of living environment), even if they’ve run out of money.
  • Name 2 opportunities they can use to serve Elders beyond their doors.

Suggested for: Formal Leaders, Decision-makers; Elders, Families, Volunteer Care Partners; Assisted Living; Small Residential Care Settings and/or Host Homes; Senior Housing; CCRC/Life Plan Communities; Home & Community-Based Services


F2: Becoming a Dementia Inclusive Community – Sherbrooke’s Journey

Robin Kitchen, Manager for Learning and Growth. Sherbrooke Community Centre
Kim Schmidt, Leader Resident Care Services, Sherbrooke Community Centre
Melinda Sweeney, Neighbourhood Manager, Sherbrooke Community Centre

What if we opened our doors and became a dementia inclusive community, where everyone works together to support the well-being of individuals living with dementia? For the past 2 years, a committee at Sherbrooke has worked toward making this vision a reality. Learn how, together, we have deconstructed the impact of stigma, improved understanding, increased the capacity of a supportive community, and swung open the doors… so that all Elders are equally welcome to live, learn, and grow within our amazing community.

The attendees will be able to:

  • Name 2 reasons to end segregation of people living with dementia.
  • List 2 key strategies successfully applied by Sherbrooke in their efforts to end segregation.
  • Identify 2 key aspects of developing a committee-based process for creating inclusive community.

Dementia Care Track

Suggested for: Formal Leaders, Decision-makers; Elders, Families, Volunteer Care Partners; Skilled Nursing; Assisted Living; Small Residential Care Settings and/or Host Homes; Employee Care Partners; Senior Housing; CCRC/Life Plan Communities


F3: Women as Leaders – High Heels NOT Required

Sally Hopkins, Executive Director, Eden in Oz & NZ Ltd
Angie McAllister, Director of Quality of Life and Culture Change, Signature HealthCare

Why are women under represented in leadership roles across many organizations? Why is it that women who find themselves in leadership positions are often seen as emotional, vulnerable, and less capable, competent and reliable? Using Eden Alternative Principles Eight and Ten, we will examine the stigmas and myths about women in leadership, identify the skills required to encourage women to take up the leadership challenge, and focus on the opportunities to lead well and create authentic leaders and teams across any organization. By engaging more women as leaders, we have the potential to create collaborative communities, empower all stakeholders, and engage an underutilized resource of skill, knowledge and wisdom.

The attendees will be able to:

  • Name 2 myths about women in leadership.
  • Identify 2 types of leadership styles.
  • Specify 2 strengths women leaders may offer an organization.

Leadership Track

Suggested for: Formal Leaders, Decision-makers; Elders, Families, Volunteer Care Partners; Skilled Nursing; Assisted Living; Small Residential Care Settings and/or Host Homes; Employee Care Partners; Senior Housing; CCRC/Life Plan Communities; Home & Community-Based Services


F4: When Mind Meets Body (Part 3)

Hope Carwile, Innovations Specialist, Vivage Senior Living

As a practice, Integrative Wellness supports behavior management, the evolution of psychotherapy, trauma informed care and reintroduces the mind to the body. During this presentation the audience will learn practical, affordable steps for infusing integrative wellness strategies into daily life. The group will be introduced to mindfulness techniques, such as chair yoga, guided meditation, breath work, aromatherapy, and will develop a self-care plan based on the Eden Alternative Domains of Well-BeingSM. Bring your curiosity and explore the ability of mind, body and spirit to bring your best self forward, no matter the challenge.

The attendees will be able to:

  • Name 3 factors which contribute to deregulation of the central nervous system, epi-genetics and resiliency.
  • Identify 3 complementary/alternative approaches that are contributing to psychotherapy and evolving into mind-body techniques.
  • List 3 ways to support their personal and community-wide well-being.

Trauma-Informed Care Track

Suggested for: Formal Leaders, Decision-makers; Elders, Families, Volunteer Care Partners; Skilled Nursing; Assisted Living; Small Residential Care Settings and/or Host Homes; Employee Care Partners; Senior Housing; CCRC/Life Plan Communities; Home & Community-Based Services


F5: Disrupt ISMs: Revolutionize Person-Directed Relationships

Mel Coppola, President and Owner, Hearts In Care, LLC
Laura Beck, Learning and Development Guide, The Eden Alternative
Jill Vitale-Aussem, President and CEO, The Eden Alternative

Stereotypes and assumptions prevent us from seeing each unique individual deeply – the keystone of person-directed support. As change agents, we are challenged as products of a culture rife with ageism and ableism. ISMs fly under the radar. Deeply ingrained in our unconscious, they undermine our relationships and the quality of the care we provide. This session will deconstruct the impact of ageism and ableism on all stakeholders, highlight the “double whammy” created by their compound effect, and feature real life solutions and stories of hope that defy the “otherization” of people based on their age and abilities.

Attendees will be able to:

  • List 2 psychological/sociological reasons why ageism/ ableism exist
  • Identify 2 ways that ageism and ableism create loneliness, helplessness, and boredom
  • Name 2 strategies for helping care partner teams explore and reframe perceptions of aging and living with different abilities

Suggested for: Formal Leaders, Decision-makers; Elders, Families, Volunteer Care Partners; Skilled Nursing; Assisted Living; Small Residential Care Settings and/or Host Homes; Employee Care Partners; Senior Housing; CCRC/Life Plan Communities; Home & Community-Based Services


F6: The Power of Participation: Include and Unleash Everyone

Kavan Peterson, COO, Minka

In just three years, Harvest Home Care built a million-dollar employee and elder-managed business based on Eden Alternative principles and boasting 90% year over year employee and customer retention. How did we do it? By including and unleashing everyone’s greatest creative potential through the power of Liberating Structures. Liberating Structures is a global, open-source participatory design movement based on core person-centered principles strongly aligned with the culture change movement. Liberating Structures provides a framework of micro-structures that anyone can immediately access and apply to their work.

Attendees will be able to:

  • Name 2 key aspects of Liberating Structures, in theory or practice.
  • List 2 qualities of self-managed organizations.
  • Identify 2 tools that evaluate progress and make adjustments without requiring “experts.”

Leadership Track

Suggested for: Formal Leaders, Decision-makers; Elders, Families, Volunteer Care Partners; Small Residential Care Settings and/or Host Homes; Employee Care Partners; Home & Community-Based Services


F7: Person-Centered Dying from the Doula’s Perspective

Sandra Place, Healthcare Educator & Consultant, Rolf Consulting
Cheryl Kruschke, Professor, Regis University

We have forgotten about the person at the center of the dying experience. Dying is a uniquely personal and deeply spiritual experience. With a different understanding and mindset, almost every death can be more meaningful, if we talk about it and know what to demand for ourselves, and others, in the situation. These experienced end-of-life doulas have wisdom and passion to share through their personal stories of commitment, love, and intentional community building. In addition, participants will experience a Death Café, which may increase awareness of how the dying experience can enhance well-being in our daily lives.

The attendees will be able to:

  • Name 2 ways that the work of end-of-life doulas relates to the practical changes needed in care systems moving forward.
  • Identify 2 ways that person-directed, end-of-life care is accomplished in collaboration ‘with’ the individual and not ‘for’ them.
  • List 2 ways that laypersons can play meaningful roles in caregiving at the end of life and support a person-directed approach to dying that will yield a good death and lasting legacy.

Suggested for: Formal Leaders, Decision-makers; Elders, Families, Volunteer Care Partners; Skilled Nursing; Assisted Living; Small Residential Care Settings and/or Host Homes; Employee Care Partners; Senior Housing; CCRC/Life Plan Communities; Home & Community-Based Services


F8: “The Most Beautiful Thing I’ve Ever Seen…” – Conversation, Engagement, Connection

Deborah Skovron, CircleTalk™ Director/Creative Director, Passageworks Institute
Cammie Cloman, CircleTalk™ Master Coach

Why are social isolation and loneliness so devastating for older people? The session will lay out foundational research on how harmful social isolation is for Elders and how it impacts well-being, physically, mentally and spiritually. A person’s basic human needs for connection, relationship and belonging can be directly met through an articulated, conversation-based approach. This is an interactive session to give participants a hands-on, “felt” experience of CircleTalk™ engagement activities, as they engage in simulations, demonstrations and debriefing to process their experience and fully understand principles and practices that facilitate interaction, connection, and belonging.

Attendees will be able to:

  • Name 2 risk factors for social isolation and loneliness.
  • List 2 current best practices involving the CircleTalk™ method for increasing engagement, connection and belonging among Elders.
  • Identify 2 impacts of a CircleTalk™ discussion activity to create meaningful interactions.

Suggested for: Formal Leaders, Decision-makers; Elders, Families, Volunteer Care Partners; Skilled Nursing; Assisted Living; Small Residential Care Settings and/or Host Homes; Senior Housing; CCRC/Life Plan Communities; Home & Community-Based Services


F9: Community Connections: Sherbrooke as a Part of Saskatoon, Canada, and Beyond

Eric Anderson, Communications Leader, Sherbrooke Community Centre
Glenda Bergen, Manager of Laundry and Environmental Services, Sherbrooke Community Centre

Sherbrooke takes pride in its many community engagements, from intergenerational connections to connecting with corporate volunteers, and the joy they bring to Elders. This presentation will take you through the keys to developing meaningful community relationships, how giving back will develop world changers within your community, and how Elders can become mentors to younger generations. You will also learn to identify potential community connections in your town/city and the benefits of the connections for Elders and community members. Finally, you will discover how social media can be an excellent way to acknowledge and celebrate community partnerships. Come and learn how Elders can leave their mark on the larger community.

Attendees will be able to:

  • List 2 potential community connections in your town/city.
  • Name 2 ways that meaningful community relationships are developed.
  • Identify 2 social media strategies that can be leveraged to celebrate community connections.

Suggested for: Formal Leaders, Decision-makers; Elders, Families, Volunteer Care Partners; Small Residential Care Settings and/or Host Homes; Employee Care Partners; Home & Community-Based Services