Breakout Session G

Thursday, April 30, 2020 from 10:00 to 11:30am

G1: Growing Corporate Culture Through Servant Leadership

Chris Cheek, President and Owner, SentryCare, Inc.

To be successful in any culture change initiative, managers must think and act differently.  The short-sighted thinking of quick profits must give way to a more sustainable growth-oriented approach. Frankly, sustainable change takes time, and how we go about that change and the people who lead that change will determine its success. In the end, the organization led by individuals whose managerial DNA has been transformed will be more successful, profitable and sustainable.

Attendees will be able to:

  • Name 2 reasons that accountability is mission critical in growing teams.
  • Identify 2 reasons why the quality of your team management process is vital to your success.
  • List 2 reasons why ongoing growth must be a primary focus of culture change leaders.

Leadership Track

Suggested for: Formal Leaders, Decision-makers; Skilled Nursing; Assisted Living; Employee Care Partners


G2: With A Little Help from My Friends… Care Partners, That Is!

Mel Coppola, President and Owner, Hearts In Care, LLC
Brian LeBlanc, International Speaker and Dementia Advocate

Much of the narrative we hear about dementia revolves around the people who support individuals living with dementia. Yet, the Alzheimer’s Association estimates, in its 2018 Facts and Figures Report, that approximately 1 million people with Alzheimer’s Disease live alone.  Hear from one such person, Brian LeBlanc, regarding how he lives well by himself with Alzheimer’s Disease. Learn about the importance of his care partner team and about the adaptations he has made in order to continue living alone. Join us in brainstorming supportive ideas/services to help Brian and others living with dementia to continue living independently, if they so choose.

Attendees will be able to:

  • Name 2 reasons that living alone and/or remaining independent are basic human rights, regardless of ability.
  • Identify 2 potential members of an empowered, collaborative care partner team.
  • List 2 supports, services and/or adaptations that enable people living with dementia to live independently.

Dementia Care Track

Suggested for: Elders, Families, Volunteer Care Partners; Assisted Living; Small Residential Care Settings and/or Host Homes; Employee Care Partners; Senior Housing; CCRC/Life Plan Communities; Home & Community-Based Services


G3: Building Resiliency: Shifting Perspectives and Creating Collaborations to Enhance Workforce Opportunities

Amy Dore, Professor, Metropolitan State University of Denver

Whether clinical or administrative, it is well-known there is a shortage of health professionals, who are competent and interested in working with older people. How can we educate and change perspectives associated with working in the aging services field? How can academic institutions collaborate with aging services professionals to diminish the workforce shortages? This multi-focal presentation centers on workforce development within the aging services field from the viewpoints of students, faculty, and LTC/LTSS staff. From the viewpoint of a large, urban academic institution, learn how a multi-phase, 4-year research project introduced unexpected perspectives and opportunities for win-win collaborations to increase workforce opportunities.

Attendees will be able to:

  • List 2 perceptions of aging and aging services commonly held by current students.
  • Name 2 ways you build relationships and collaborations to broaden the workforce pipeline.
  • Identify 2 innovative opportunities to “grow” the aging services profession and to increase awareness of workforce opportunities.

Workforce Engagement Track

Suggested for: Formal Leaders, Decision-makers; Elders, Families, Volunteer Care Partners; Skilled Nursing; Assisted Living; Employee Care Partners; Senior Housing; CCRC/Life Plan Communities; Academia


G4: Creating Circles of Connection (Part 4)

Lisa Kendall, Proprietor, Lisa Kendall Counseling & Consulting
Rebecca Hubbard, Eden Educator, Independent Contractor
Hope Carwile, Innovations Specialist, Vivage Senior Living
Evy Cugelman, Eden Educator, Contract Educator with Eden Alternative USA and Canada, Retired

Disconnection drives the pain of loneliness, helplessness, and boredom, and creating community is the soul of a healing human habitat. Join the facilitators of the Trauma-Informed Care Track for a closing circle, where questions and comments about well-being for ourselves and those we care for can be explored in a safe space. This informal circle experience serves as a stand-alone workshop, or as the culmination of the Trauma-Informed Care Track. Let’s come together and brainstorm innovative ways to continue our healing process as individuals and as a community.

Attendees will be able to:

  • Identify 2 person-directed practices that are currently working well to support well-being in behavioral health.
  • Discuss 2 challenges faced by organizations in supporting well-being for Elders and their care partners.
  • Commit to 1 concrete action to advance personal or organizational practices to support well-being in behavioral health.

Trauma-Informed Care Track

Suggested for: Formal Leaders, Decision-makers; Elders, Families, Volunteer Care Partners; Skilled Nursing; Assisted Living; Small Residential Care Settings and/or Host Homes; Employee Care Partners; Senior Housing; CCRC/Life Plan Communities; Home & Community-Based Services


G5: Spiritual Needs and Faith Concerns: The KNOTS Which Limit Well-Being

Ro Fesser, Chaplain, Eben Ezer, Lutheran Care Center
Shaire Chavez, Community and Volunteer Coordinator, Eben Ezer, Lutheran Care Center

This session will explore the knots that bind the Eden Alternative Domains of Well-BeingSM, spiritual needs, and faith concerns. Shame, guilt, anger, fear, loss, regrets, and dark secrets are spiritual needs and faith concerns that keep Elders from reaching the peaks of well-being in their final years. Participants will draw connections to the Domains of Well-Being, listen to specific stories of Elders trapped by an avalanche of spiritual needs and faith concerns, and discover tools to uncover well-being.

Attendees will be able to:

  • Specify 2 ways that spiritual needs and faith concerns relate to the Eden Alternative Domains of Well-BeingSM in general.
  • Identify 2 spiritual needs and faith concerns that limit the Eden Alternative Domains of Well-BeingSM .
  • Identify 2 tools/resources that can help resolve a spiritual need or faith concern for an Elder.

Suggested for:  Formal Leaders, Decision-makers; Elders, Families, Volunteer Care Partners; Skilled Nursing; Assisted Living; Small Residential Care Settings and/or Host Homes; Employee Care Partners; Senior Housing; CCRC/Life Plan Communities; Home & Community-Based Services


G6: Boost Energy/Slash Burnout for Caregivers & the People They Serve

Cathy Richards, Lifestyle and Wellness Coach and Strategist, Inspiring Vitality

A caregiver’s day can be draining, both physically and mentally. What if you could equip them with strategies to feel stronger physically and mentally and boost energy? What if you could also arm them with energy-building strategies for the people they serve, adding new skills for the caregiver and new value for the client? It’s never too early or too late to get on the path to greater well-being. Small changes can deliver real results and you simply can’t afford not to! Join us for double the strategies for double the ENERGY.

Attendees will be able to:

  • Identify 2 practical strategies to boost physical energy and mental clarity for caregivers.
  • Name 2 energy-building strategies caregivers can employ for the people they serve.
  • List 2 ways that strategies shared through this session can impact their business model.

Workforce Engagement Track

Suggested for: Formal Leaders, Decision-makers; Elders, Families, Volunteer Care Partners; Skilled Nursing; Assisted Living; Small Residential Care Settings and/or Host Homes; Employee Care Partners; Senior Housing; CCRC/Life Plan Communities; Home & Community-Based Services


G7: Elders are the Lifeblood of Our Culture, Wisdom, and Future

James Lyon, Life Enhancement Director, Colorow Care Center
Olivia Mogab, Quality Improvement Specialist, Recreation and Leisure, Vivage Senior Living
Susan Likens, Licensed Professional Counselor, Susan Likens, Ph. D, LPC

We live in a culture where we devalue our most important resource for community and strength, our Elders. Our culture has created a dilemma by dismissing our Elders into non-essential roles in our society. In comparison, there are other cultures that have harnessed the rich resource of older people. An extension of this dilemma are structural and cultural changes. We have kicked aside valuable wisdom and a traditional glue of community. We can revolutionize our culture and re-engage the gifts of Elderhood and acknowledge its impact on relationships, especially for our youth and Elders who starve for this connection.

Attendees will be able to:

  • Identify 2 specific cultures that elevate and revere their Elders.
  • List 2 specific cultural changes which have caused a decline in our reverence of and relationships with Elders.
  • Name 3 specific attributes/ life skills Elders embrace, which equips them to rise into a unique role in their communities.

Suggested for: Formal Leaders, Decision-makers; Skilled Nursing; Assisted Living; Employee Care Partners


G8: The Power of Social Connection

John Binder, Principal, KEPHART community :: planning :: architecture
Mary Ann Mulligan, Executive Director, Eaton Senior Communities
Sarah Schoeder, Wellness Director, Eaton Senior Communities

Humans are inherently social creatures. We crave connection and desire belonging. This is especially important as we age, so it is critical to create spaces and engagement potential that foster social connection between Elders and their employee and family care partners. Join a lively discussion between professionals in the field, as they explore the benefits and value of social connection and the strategies being implemented in congregate living communities that create more opportunities for connectedness. This presentation includes an interactive discussion between the panelists, audience engagement through smaller groups, and share back forum featuring participant reflections.

Attendees will be able to: 

  • Identify 2 reasons why fostering connection between all members of the care partner team (Elders, employees, and family members) is crucial to creating well-being.
  • Name 4 ways to promote social interaction through engagement and/or adapting the physical space.
  • List 2 examples offered by peers in our field of successful cultivation of social connection in their communities.

Suggested for: Formal Leaders, Decision-makers; Elders, Families, Volunteer Care Partners; Skilled Nursing; Assisted Living; Small Residential Care Settings and/or Host Homes; Senior Housing; CCRC/Life Plan Communities